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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

internet

This scale uses four, seven-point items to measure the degree to which a person believes that an e-mail message he/she has received from a company is annoying and confusing.

Three, seven-point items measure a person’s belief that an e-mail message he/she has received is risky in some way.  (The type of risk is not specified in the scale.)

A person’s level of trust in the benevolence, integrity, and competence of someone who has sent him/her a product-related message via e-mail is measured with nine, seven-point items.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items compose the scale and measure a person’s willingness to let a particular website track and analyze his/her navigation through the World Wide Web.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure one’s belief that it is fair for visitors to give something to a website in return for access to free content.

The extent to which a person believes that the visitor-related procedures used by a website are fair, particularly with respect to handling information, is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

The belief that a large amount of a website’s content is created by its users and substantially contributes to its value is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a consumer typically experiences a sense of being in another reality when shopping online is measured with four statements.  As currently phrased, the items are not specific to a particular website but rather to online shopping in general.

With three, nine-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how reliable and believable a consumer believes an online store to be.  Given the phrasing of one of the items, the consumer has purchased a particular product from the store.  To make the scale amenable for use with respondents who may not have purchased from the store, the item can be easily edited.

The degree to which a person believes that online gambling is socially acceptable according to dominant norms and values is measured with twelve, seven-point Likert-type items.