You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

This website has truly been a welcome gift! The Day Pass is extremely affordable & the site is so user friendly to navigate. It provides a wealth of information including, the source, validity, & references for my doctorate research project. I highly recommend this to anyone as it is truly an invaluable research tool!
Suzanne Cromlish, PhD
Saint Xavier University, Chicago

internet

The scale has four, seven-point items that measure the degree to which a person believes that an e-mail message he/she received from a company is relevant and a convenient source of information.

This scale uses four, seven-point items to measure the degree to which a person believes that an e-mail message he/she has received from a company is annoying and confusing.

Three, seven-point items measure a person’s belief that an e-mail message he/she has received is risky in some way.  (The type of risk is not specified in the scale.)

A person’s level of trust in the benevolence, integrity, and competence of someone who has sent him/her a product-related message via e-mail is measured with nine, seven-point items.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items compose the scale and measure a person’s willingness to let a particular website track and analyze his/her navigation through the World Wide Web.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure one’s belief that it is fair for visitors to give something to a website in return for access to free content.

The extent to which a person believes that the visitor-related procedures used by a website are fair, particularly with respect to handling information, is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

The belief that a large amount of a website’s content is created by its users and substantially contributes to its value is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a consumer typically experiences a sense of being in another reality when shopping online is measured with four statements.  As currently phrased, the items are not specific to a particular website but rather to online shopping in general.

With three, nine-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how reliable and believable a consumer believes an online store to be.  Given the phrasing of one of the items, the consumer has purchased a particular product from the store.  To make the scale amenable for use with respondents who may not have purchased from the store, the item can be easily edited.