You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

investments

With three, seven-point Likert-type items the scale measures how much a consumer feels that he/she has devoted money, emotion, and other psychological resources to an object.

The extent to which a person believes he/she has what it takes to make wise financial decisions, especially with respect to investments, is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items. 

The scale has four, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person is unsure about how a company’s stock will perform.

The extent to which a person believes that he/she knows what a company does and can describe them to others is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

The level of risk-related concern a consumer has about purchasing a particular object is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  While the scale was made for use with a product, it appears it could be used with other objects that may not be considered “products” per se such as a house, a company’s stocks, or a rare piece of art.

Four, seven-point items compose the scale and are used to measure how successful a company is expected to be in the future.

Using five, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the extent to which a consumer believes he/she has spent a lot of time and effort on a relationship with a current provider.

A person's knowledge of various typical consumer financial products is measured by asking ten questions.  It is considered an objective measure rather than a subjective one because each question has a correct answer rather than being a person's opinion of his/her knowledge level.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure one's self-expressed level of understanding of a particular investment, especially how it functions in saving money, and one's comfort in choosing to invest in it.

A person's self-expressed level of understanding a particular object (topic, product, company, et cetera) is measured in the scale with three, seven-point items.