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The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

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Seven, nine-point unipolar items are used to measure one's positive emotional reaction to a certain advertisement.

Using seven, five-point Likert-type statements, the scale measures the degree to which a set of commercials a person has been exposed to is viewed as unpleasant and annoying .

The scale uses seven Likert-type items to measure a person's opinion about television commercials in general.

Three Likert-type statements are used to measure the extent to which a person believes that advertising is annoying. The items are general enough so that they can refer advertising in general or to advertising in a specific medium. The scale was not, however, developed for use with a specific ad.

The scale is composed of five, five-point Likert-type statements measuring the extent to which a person expresses a variety of negative beliefs about advertising in general.

The scale is composed of ten, five-point Likert-type statements measuring a person's attitude toward advertising across a variety of media and whether or not it is enjoyable or interesting.

Five, five-point Likert-type statements are used to measure consumer attitudes about advertising in general. A seven-item version of the scale with similar psychometric properties is also available.

The scale is composed of seven-point items measuring the extent to which a television viewer reports engaging in behaviors that indicate he/she is trying to avoid commercials when they come on.

This measure is composed of several uni-polar items and is purported to measure the degree of negative feelings a consumer reports experiencing when exposed to a specific advertisement. The scale has been used over time with varying numbers of items.

There is an important distinction between this measure and attitude-toward-the-ad. As Mooradian stated in the directions used with his scale, subjects were to describe "reactions to the ad, not to how you would describe the ad" (1996, p. 101). Admittedly, there should be a high correspondence between the two but they are still theoretically distinct constructs.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point items measuring the extent to which a person reports engaging in behaviors that indicate he/she tries to avoid listening to radio commercials.