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Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

judgment

Three, seven-point items are used to measure how much a person believes that talking to another person about a particular topic could produce a favorable impression for him/herself.

Nine items are used to measure the tendency to accept one’s thoughts and feelings as they occur without evaluation or self-criticism.

How much a person is worried about what another person thinks of him/her, with an emphasis on being judged unfavorably, is measured in this scale with three, seven-point items.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a person engages in a psychological separation process such that judgments of another person's performance in a role are selectively dissociated from that person's morality.  The scale makes most sense to use when a well-known individual has been accused of some immoral activity apart from the primary role he/she plays.

Three items are used in this scale to measure how well a person judges his/her performance to have been of a recently completed task.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure the degree to which a person believes that another person (specified) has similar "taste" and judgment in evaluating a certain object.

Seven-point items are used to measure the expressed likelihood that a person would accept the opinion and selection of another person with respect to a particular product choice.

The scale is composed of three questions that are intended to measure the amount of difficulty a person has had in stating reasons for a behavior or decision he/she has made.

The scale has four, seven-point Likert-type statements that measure how much a person places emphasis on the consequences of a decision being made rather than the process being used because of the belief that he/she is responsible for the former rather than the latter.

The three-item, five-point scale measures the extent to which one person believes that another person "knows best" in a certain situation. Due to the phrasing of the items and the context in which it was developed, the focus of the scale is on the perceived trust a client has in a specific service provider. The type of service provider studied by Price and Arnould (1999) was a hairstylist.