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I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

kindness

Four, seven-point uni-polar items are used to measure how much a person is described as being kind and friendly.  (Two versions of the scale are described, both having four items and three of them being in common.)

How friendly and sociable a person appears to be is measured with four, seven-point semantic differentials. 

Four, seven-point semantic-differentials compose the scale and measure how much a person believes that something (person, organization, action) is kind and ethical or, at the other extreme, cruel and immoral.

The scale uses four, seven-point unipolar items to measure how caring and kind a person is considered to be.

Fourteen, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person’s trait-like tendency to be concerned about the needs of others as well as expecting help from them when needed.

The degree to which a person considers another person to be friendly and caring about him/herself (the person completing the scale) is measured with five, seven-point semantic differentials.

Three semantic differentials are used to measure how cooperative and kind a person is.  As used by Fisher and Ma (2014), the judgement is made regarding someone else rather than oneself.

Three unipolar items are used with a seven-point response format to describe the kindness-related trait of some object such as a person or an organization.

The degree to which a person exhibits a set of moral traits that are visible to others in his/her behavior is measured in this scale with five, seven-point Likert-type items.  The traits are typified by compassion and trustworthiness.

The four item, seven-point Likert-type scale measures the degree to which a consumer believes that the support provided by a particular business organization to a charity is generous and unselfish.