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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

knowledge

The degree to which a customer believes a service provider is the best is because it understands his/her needs better than the others.  The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale measures the degree to which a person believes a particular candidate has positive attributes such as sincerity and knowledgeability that make him/her qualified for the political office.

The degree of certainty a person has in the appropriateness of a particular choice in which one option was selected over another one (explicitly stated) is measured in this five-item Likert scale.

Using three, seven-point items, this scale measures how much a person feels uncertain about a choice he/she has made.

The scale uses three statements to measure a consumer’s belief that he/she has expert level knowledge with respect to a specific product category and is an excellent source of information for friends buying such a product.

The scale has four, seven-point items that measure a consumer’s relative level of familiarity with a product category as well as a good understanding of the attributes that will provide satisfaction.

The degree to which a person expresses confidence in his/her ability to find information about a product in order to make a decision is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  While this scale might be used with sources other than online, it seems to be most suited for that context.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree of knowledge a person has about the normal price level of a particular product category.

The scale uses four, seven-point Likert-type items to measure a person’s belief that he/she has greater experience with, interest in, and usage of the internet than most people.

Ten, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure how knowledgeable a person reports being with regard to jokes.  Although the scale measures self-reported awareness and recall of jokes, it does not explicitly measure if a person believes him/herself to be funny in telling the jokes.