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Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

knowledge

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree of knowledge a person has about the normal price level of a particular product category.

The scale uses four, seven-point Likert-type items to measure a person’s belief that he/she has greater experience with, interest in, and usage of the internet than most people.

Ten, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure how knowledgeable a person reports being with regard to jokes.  Although the scale measures self-reported awareness and recall of jokes, it does not explicitly measure if a person believes him/herself to be funny in telling the jokes.

Using seven statements, this scale measures the degree to which a person believes that he/she is familiar with and has experience using goods and/or services in a particular domain.  Versions of the scale are described for tech products, fast-food restaurants, personal banking, movie theaters, and social media websites.

Using four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures to what degree a participant in a research project believes that her/she knows what is being studied, with an emphasis on awareness of the hypotheses being tested.  

Four statements are used to measure the degree to which a customer believes that a particular service provider helps him/her to become more knowledgeable and skilled with respect to the service.

The scale has four, five-point Likert-type items and measures how much a consumer believes that if he/she were to change service providers then new policies would have to be learned.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a consumer is sure that buying a particular product is the correct decision.

The degree of familiarity with something such as an object or topic is measured with three, seven-point bi-polar adjectives.  The items themselves are extremely flexible for use in a variety of contexts and it is up to the instructions provided with them to specify whose knowledge about what is being assessed.

A person's belief that he/she has the ability to adhere to specific dietary guidelines is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.