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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

knowledge

The scale uses four, seven-point Likert-type items to measure a person’s belief that he/she has greater experience with, interest in, and usage of the internet than most people.

Ten, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure how knowledgeable a person reports being with regard to jokes.  Although the scale measures self-reported awareness and recall of jokes, it does not explicitly measure if a person believes him/herself to be funny in telling the jokes.

Using seven statements, this scale measures the degree to which a person believes that he/she is familiar with and has experience using goods and/or services in a particular domain.  Versions of the scale are described for tech products, fast-food restaurants, personal banking, movie theaters, and social media websites.

Using four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures to what degree a participant in a research project believes that her/she knows what is being studied, with an emphasis on awareness of the hypotheses being tested.  

Four statements are used to measure the degree to which a customer believes that a particular service provider helps him/her to become more knowledgeable and skilled with respect to the service.

The scale has four, five-point Likert-type items and measures how much a consumer believes that if he/she were to change service providers then new policies would have to be learned.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a consumer is sure that buying a particular product is the correct decision.

The degree of familiarity with something such as an object or topic is measured with three, seven-point bi-polar adjectives.  The items themselves are extremely flexible for use in a variety of contexts and it is up to the instructions provided with them to specify whose knowledge about what is being assessed.

A person's belief that he/she has the ability to adhere to specific dietary guidelines is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a consumer reports having a lot of knowledge and experience with so-called "green products" is measured using four, seven-point Likert-type items.