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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

knowledge

How familiar a consumer is with a brand based on hearing about it, buying it, and/or using it is measured with four, seven-point semantic-differentials.

How difficult a person thinks it would be to make a particular choice is measured in this scale with three, seven-point Likert items.

With four, seven-point items, the scale measures how much a person thinks that a particular other person knows a brand better than other consumers and could be considered an expert. 

Containing eight, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures very basic beliefs and comprehension of what buyers and sellers do.  The scale seems most relevant to use for those living in subsistence marketplaces.  It may also be useful when studying what children understand about the market.

The scale is composed of five Likert-type statements that are used to measure one’s confidence in his/her ability to buy the “right” brand that will lead to a satisfying outcome.

One's attitude regarding his/her ability to accurately remember things he/she has experienced or known in the past is measured with four, seven-point items.

The scale uses three, seven-point items to measure the level of understanding a person believes he/she has of annuities.

The scale has three, seven-point items that measure how well a shopper believes that he/she was better informed than others for a particular purchase due to materials read as well as engaging in other research activities.

Three items are employed to measure how skilled a consumer believes him/herself to be in finding information, especially with respect to products.

Thirteen items are used to measure the level of objective knowledge a person has of basic financial concepts.  An eight-item version is also discussed.