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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

knowledge

The scale has four, seven-point items that measure a consumer’s relative level of familiarity with a product category as well as a good understanding of the attributes that will provide satisfaction.

The degree to which a person expresses confidence in his/her ability to find information about a product in order to make a decision is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  While this scale might be used with sources other than online, it seems to be most suited for that context.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree of knowledge a person has about the normal price level of a particular product category.

The scale uses four, seven-point Likert-type items to measure a person’s belief that he/she has greater experience with, interest in, and usage of the internet than most people.

Ten, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure how knowledgeable a person reports being with regard to jokes.  Although the scale measures self-reported awareness and recall of jokes, it does not explicitly measure if a person believes him/herself to be funny in telling the jokes.

Using seven statements, this scale measures the degree to which a person believes that he/she is familiar with and has experience using goods and/or services in a particular domain.  Versions of the scale are described for tech products, fast-food restaurants, personal banking, movie theaters, and social media websites.

Using four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures to what degree a participant in a research project believes that her/she knows what is being studied, with an emphasis on awareness of the hypotheses being tested.  

Four statements are used to measure the degree to which a customer believes that a particular service provider helps him/her to become more knowledgeable and skilled with respect to the service.

The scale has four, five-point Likert-type items and measures how much a consumer believes that if he/she were to change service providers then new policies would have to be learned.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a consumer is sure that buying a particular product is the correct decision.