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The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

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Three, seven-point items are used to measure the degree to which a person believes that another person (specified) has similar "taste" and judgment in evaluating a certain object.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person's interest in having more information about something. The object of interest in the study by Jones and Reynolds (2006) was a retail store.

Four, seven-point items are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a person believes that a product is difficult to understand and use. While the scale was developed to be used with innovations, it appears to be amenable for use with a wide variety of products, despite the extent to which they are viewed as innovations.

This scale has five, seven-point Likert-type statements that measure the degree to which a person feels effectual and capable in his/her life, with an emphasis on the role played by a specific person.

The intended purpose of this five item scale is to measure the degree of self-assuredness someone has about an attitude toward some object.

Three, nine-point Likert-type items are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a person is sure that, during a recent purchase experience, the product that was selected met his/her needs.

Three, seven-point semantic-differentials are used to measure the degree to which a consumer believes that a product will function well and as it is intended to.

Three items with a seven-point Likert-type response format are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a person reports feeling in control of some object or activity.

The scale is composed of three, five-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a consumer is familiar with the quality of other service providers and has, in fact, tried some other providers over time. This scale was called alternative experience by Burnham, Frels, and Mahajan (2003) to distinguish it from the other scale of switching experience they used. That one appears to tap into the same construct as this one except that it emphasizes the quantity of switching a bit more, especially in the last two years.

The level of pleasure a consumer expresses having with shopping is measured in this seven, seven-point Likert-type scale. The activities are viewed as more than just a necessary means to an end but as something enjoyable in themselves including focused and nonfocused search aspects.