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knowledge

Three, nine-point items are used to measure the degree to which a consumer reports being familiar with a particular buying situation.

Three, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person's sense of whether other people use coupons when they shop. The scale was called interpersonal influence by Tat and Bejou (1994)

A set of noncomparative cognitions a person has toward a brand of luxury sedan are measured in this scale using six, seven-point Likert-type items.

This is an eight-item, five-point Likert-type scale measuring the number of times a customer indicates having been contacted by his/her agent in the previous two years. Crosby and Stephens (1987) used the scale with policy owners and asked them to respond with regard to their insurance agents.

Two-item, five-point items are used to measure the recalled number of times a company failed to handle a customer's request in the previous two years. Crosby and Stephens (1987) used the scale with policy owners and asked them to respond about insurance companies.

This is a four-item scale measuring the enduring and intrinsic (rather than situational) relevance of an object to a person. The object in the Slama and Tashchian (1987) study was shampoo. Stapel, Likert, and semantic differential versions of the scale were developed and tested.

A five-item, five-point Likert-type scale is used in measuring the number of times in the previous two years a customer recalls receiving information from his/her insurance company about policies or other products.

This scale has four, seven-point Likert-type statements that measure a person's reported knowledge and confidence about the right over-the-counter drugs to buy for treatment of an ailment.

This is a Likert-type scale that measures a person's desire to understand how a product works. It was referred to as the Creativity/Curiosity component of the Use Innovativeness Index by Childers (1986) as well as Price and Ridgway (1983).

This is a two-item, five-point Likert-type scale measuring the number of times in the previous two years a customer recalls being exposed to mass media advertisements by his/her a particular company.