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Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

knowledge

Four statements are used to measure the degree to which a customer believes that a particular service provider helps him/her to become more knowledgeable and skilled with respect to the service.

The scale has four, five-point Likert-type items and measures how much a consumer believes that if he/she were to change service providers then new policies would have to be learned.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a consumer is sure that buying a particular product is the correct decision.

The degree of familiarity with something such as an object or topic is measured with three, seven-point bi-polar adjectives.  The items themselves are extremely flexible for use in a variety of contexts and it is up to the instructions provided with them to specify whose knowledge about what is being assessed.

A person's belief that he/she has the ability to adhere to specific dietary guidelines is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a consumer reports having a lot of knowledge and experience with so-called "green products" is measured using four, seven-point Likert-type items.

A person's knowledge of various typical consumer financial products is measured by asking ten questions.  It is considered an objective measure rather than a subjective one because each question has a correct answer rather than being a person's opinion of his/her knowledge level.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure one's self-expressed level of understanding of a particular investment, especially how it functions in saving money, and one's comfort in choosing to invest in it.

A person's self-confidence in his/her ability to open e-mail messages if so desired is measured using five items. 

How easily a person is able to convert an amount of money in an unfamiliar currency to an equivalent amount in a familiar currency is measured in this scale using four, seven-point semantic differentials.