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The Marketing Scales website is a gold mine of information.  It is the only source that helps me understand the psychometric quality of the instruments used in past research.  I recommend that researchers bookmark this site . . . they will be back!
Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

knowledge

The scale has four, seven-point Likert-type items that are intended to measure how well a person believes that he/she is able to use the services of a business.

The extent to which a person knows what is expected in his/her role as a customer of a business is measured in this scale with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

One's belief that he/she understands recycling and is capable of doing it is measured in this scale with three statements.  Although not explicit in the statements themselves, the context they refer to is the type of recycling in which the individual must play an active role such as in the home.

A person's self-expressed level of skill and creativity in designing some specified object is measured in this scale using four, nine-point Likert-type items.

The clarity of the memory a person has of some particular object or event is measured with three, seven-point semantic differentials.

Four, seven-point items are used to measure a person's subjective knowledge of platforms used to play video games.  It does not attempt to measure knowledge of games played on the devices.

Six, seven-point items are used to measure how much a person believes him/herself to have knowledge and expertise about a topic compared to other people.  While the scale can be used with regard to a product category, the items are amenable for use with many other objects and subjects as well.

Using eight, six-point, Likert-type scale items, the scale measures a dimension of attachment that has to do with a person's in-depth knowledge of an owned object and desire to spend considerable resources on it.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used in the scale to measure the degree to which a person tends to be aware of and to understand his/her emotions.

This scale uses three, seven-point items to measure how a consumer feels about the brands as a group in a particular product category.  In other words, to what extent does a person have a good or bad attitude towards most of the brands in a product class.  Fischer, Völckner, and Sattler (2010) referred to the scale as brand likability