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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

knowledge

The degree to which a person is aware and knowledgeable of a brand is measured in this scale with three, semantic differentials.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure the degree to which the person is confident about his/her ability to make predictions about a firm and its products.   The scale was referred to as uncertainty reduction by Adjei, Noble, and Noble (2010).

A person's ability to identify and categorize his/her specific moods is measured in this scale with four, five-point Likert-type items.

Using four, seven-point items, this scale measures a consumer's ability to explain the reasons why a particular brand or type of product is preferred.

This three item, seven-point scale measures a consumer's ease of making purchases within a product category because of his/her established, prepurchase preference.

This is a three-item, five-point Likert-type scale that measures the degree to which a person believes TV commercials are a good source of information about products.

This is a four-item, five-point Likert-type scale that measures the degree to which a person believes TV commercials are a good way to learn about a product's social aspects, with an emphasis on who appears to use it.

A five-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which an endorser is viewed as being knowledgeable about a topic.

This scale is a seven-item, seven-point measure of the amount of confidence a consumer has in "personal independent" sources (relative or friend) as well as "personal advocate" sources (store manager or employee).

Four, seven-point Likert-type items measure a consumer's reported knowledge of brands in a specified product category as well as the important criteria to use in making a selection.