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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

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A person's ability to identify and categorize his/her specific moods is measured in this scale with four, five-point Likert-type items.

Using four, seven-point items, this scale measures a consumer's ability to explain the reasons why a particular brand or type of product is preferred.

This three item, seven-point scale measures a consumer's ease of making purchases within a product category because of his/her established, prepurchase preference.

This is a four-item, five-point Likert-type scale that measures the degree to which a person believes TV commercials are a good way to learn about a product's social aspects, with an emphasis on who appears to use it.

This is a three-item, five-point Likert-type scale that measures the degree to which a person believes TV commercials are a good source of information about products.

A five-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which an endorser is viewed as being knowledgeable about a topic.

This scale is a seven-item, seven-point measure of the amount of confidence a consumer has in "personal independent" sources (relative or friend) as well as "personal advocate" sources (store manager or employee).

The scale is composed of four, seven-point Likert-type items that measure a consumer's perceived knowledge of brands in a specified product category as well as the confidence to make purchase decisions and give advice to others about the product class.

A three-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure a consumer's familiarity with and interest in a specified food product category. Cole and Balasubramanian (1993) studied breakfast cereal.

The seven-item, seven-point scale assesses a person's understanding of cars, with particular emphasis on having familiarity with the purchase process.