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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

knowledge

Five, seven-point Likert-type items are used in the scale to measure the degree to which a person is well familiar with the rules of returning products to stores as well as the buyer's rights to do so. Harris called the scale knowledge of returning rules and regulations.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the extent to which a consumer gathers information about product quality before making decisions because of its perceived importance.

This scale uses three items to measure the degree to which a person expresses an understanding of their product/brand preference and can explain it.  The scale was called understanding of preference by Kramer (2007).

This scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a person believes that an advertisement is responsible for changing his/her attitude about a brand. The scale was called change mind by Smith, Chen, and Yang (2008).

Four, five-point Likert-type items are used in this scale to measure the extent to which a person enjoys being a source of market-related information for others.

Three, seven-point items are used in the scale to measure a person's proficiency with the use of a language, most likely a language other than the one the person is most familiar with.

Likert-type statements are used to measure the level of knowledge a consumer expresses having about a product category compared to his/her friends.

Six, six-point items are used in this scale to measure a person's level of interest in knowing and talking about electrical production and providers.

Three, seven-point bipolar adjectives are used to measure the extent of a person's awareness of and experience with a particular stimulus. The stimuli examined in the studies mentioned below were either a particular brand or a product category.

Five, seven-point statements are used to assess a person's expressed familiarity and experience with a certain category of products. The emphasis of the scale is on knowledge and, in that sense, it is conceptually similar to many other measures of product class knowledge. However, since one item (#5, below) has to do with usage of the product, it moves the scale more towards a measure of behavioral expertise and that is the way it was viewed by Thompson et al. (2005).