You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

language

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items and measures the degree to which a person believes another person is like him/her in terms of communication style, with an emphasis on nonverbal expression.

Using three, six-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s familiarity and proficiency with the language used in a particular advertisement.

The degree of difficulty a person reports having when writing about a particular experience he/she has had is measured using four, nine-point Likert-type items. 

A person's expressed difficulty in understanding service agents who are viewed as having foreign accents is measured using four statements.

The scale uses five statements to measure a person's prejudice against service providers who sound "foreign" and live in other countries.

The scale uses three, seven-point unipolar items to measure the extent to which a person perceives words or sounds to have a cadence and/or rhyming quality.

With three, seven-point unipolar items, this scale measures how challenging a task or process is considered to be.

A person's opinion regarding the mixture of Spanish and English in conversation is measured in this scale using nine, seven-point Likert-type items.

Three, seven-point items are used in the scale to measure a person's proficiency with the use of a language, most likely a language other than the one the person is most familiar with.

The scale is composed of eight descriptors and a five-point Likert-type response scale to measure a person's opinion about the use of English in a commercial. The scale makes most sense when used in a non-English speaking country where ads are being run or considered which will use English. It is also likely that the scale itself will not be administered in English but will be translated to the appropriate language.

As used by Gerritsen et al. (2000), the measure was used in Holland with respect to a specific commercial after Dutch subjects had been exposed to it. However, it appears to be amenable for use with ads in general.