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Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

language

Seven, seven-point Likert-type items measure the degree to which a front-line employee of a business is believed to have treated a person unjustly because the customer's language skills were viewed as poor.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items and measures the degree to which a person believes another person is like him/her in terms of communication style, with an emphasis on nonverbal expression.

Using three, six-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s familiarity and proficiency with the language used in a particular advertisement.

The degree of difficulty a person reports having when writing about a particular experience he/she has had is measured using four, nine-point Likert-type items. 

A person's expressed difficulty in understanding service agents who are viewed as having foreign accents is measured using four statements.

The scale uses five statements to measure a person's prejudice against service providers who sound "foreign" and live in other countries.

The scale uses three, seven-point unipolar items to measure the extent to which a person perceives words or sounds to have a cadence and/or rhyming quality.

With three, seven-point unipolar items, this scale measures how challenging a task or process is considered to be.

A person's opinion regarding the mixture of Spanish and English in conversation is measured in this scale using nine, seven-point Likert-type items.

Three, seven-point items are used in the scale to measure a person's proficiency with the use of a language, most likely a language other than the one the person is most familiar with.