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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

learning

Four statements are used to measure the degree to which a customer believes that a particular service provider helps him/her to become more knowledgeable and skilled with respect to the service.

The scale has four, five-point Likert-type items and measures how much a consumer believes that if he/she were to change service providers then new policies would have to be learned.

A consumer’s interest in a brand that results from exposure to an ad is measured with five, seven-point items.  The interest referred to in the items ranges from learning more about the product to planning to buy it.

The scale uses three semantic differentials to measure how smart a person is subjectively judged to be.  The emphasis is on learning and grades, thus, is most suited for use with students.  As used by Fisher and Ma (2014), the judgement is made regarding someone else rather than oneself.

A person's desire for the expression of his/her opinion about a certain brand to help someone learn the values of society is measured using four, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a person believes that expressing his/her opinion about a certain brand to someone will help the relationship is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Four Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a parent holds positive beliefs about "advergames" made for children.  (Advergames are custom-made for a good or service in order to entertain potential consumers as well as promote the brand.)

Various non-monetary costs such as time, learning, and effort that are associated with changing brands within a product category are measured in this scale using five, seven-point Likert-type items.

The extent to which a person uses a website for informational purposes is measured using three, five-point Likert-type items.  The type of website studied by Hung, Li, and Tse (2011) was an online community but the scale items themselves seem to be amenable for use with a variety of shopping-related sites.

This is a four-item, five-point Likert-type scale that measures the degree to which a person believes TV commercials are a good way to learn about a product's social aspects, with an emphasis on who appears to use it.