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Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

legal

The scale has three, seven-point items that measure a person’s willingness to engage in behaviors that support the lowering of the minimum age to legally consumer alcoholic drinks.

How much a person disagrees with a particular ban is measured with three, nine-point items.  Along with instructions that can be created for use with the scale, the items are flexible for use with a variety of bans.

The scale measures a person's inclination to use the services of a particular lawyer, e.g., meet with the lawyer, recommend him/her.  It makes most since to use this scale when respondents have some familiarity with the lawyer, possibly having consulted with him/her previously.

A nine-item, four-point Likert-like scale is used to measure a person's agreement about the positive benefits of legalized casino-gambling in his/her city.

A five-item, four-point Likert-like scale is used to measure a person's agreement about the negative effects of legalized casino-gambling in his/her city.

The scale is composed of four, five-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person believes in following the law and practicing business with high integrity.

Five, five-point Likert-type statements are used to measure a person's attitude about branded products being used in movies as props with the emphasis being on the degree to which placement is preferred. The scale was referred to as perceived realism by Gupta and Gould (1997) and Gould, Gupta, and Grabner-Kräuter (2000).

The extent to which a person believes that there is a need for government regulation of programming (including commercials) aimed at children is measured by nine, five-point Likert-type items.

The scale is composed of 18 questions that are purported to measure a person's sense of the incidence of crime in the country with particular emphasis on New York City.