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Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

leisure

This scale is composed of three, seven-point items that measure how much a person believes another person is busy at work rather than spending time in leisure activities.

The scale measures the degree to which a person views a particular activity as being like a chore and requiring effort to do.  Two- and three-item versions have been tested as have versions with slightly different items.

Five, six-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person describes a behavior of his/hers as not being routine, planned, or anticipated. The behavior investigated by Unger (1981; Unger and Kernan 1983) was subjective leisure.  In the study by Guiry, Mägi, and Lutz (2006) the behavior was recreational shopping.

This is a five-item, six-point Likert-type scale that is supposed to measure the degree to which a person describes an activity or experience as being so absorbing that everything else is forgotten for a while. This scale was simply called involvement by Unger (1981; Unger and Kernan 1983) and the activity investigated was subjective leisure. In the study by Guiry, Mägi, and Lutz (2006) the activity was recreational shopping.

The extent to which a consumer indicates that shopping is something he/she likes to do is measured using seven-point Likert-type statements.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure the degree to which a person considers the normal price charged for a particular good, service, or activity make the deal a good value.

The degree to which a person indicates being a fan of some form of entertainment, particularly a sports team, is measured in this scale by three, seven-point Likert-type items.