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As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

lifestyle

This is a three-item, seven-point, Likert-type measure of the lack of time a person reports having given the things he/she generally has to do. The construct was referred to as costs of search by Srinivasan and Ratchford (1991) because of the reasoning that if a person is very busy, time for external search will be in short supply.

This four-item, five-point scale measures the frequency with which a person engages in behaviors that reflect a materially simple lifestyle with particular emphasis on buying second-hand items and not using a car for transportation.

This four-item, five-point, Likert-type scale is intended to measure the degree to which a person engages in multiple activities simultaneously. This behavior is referred to as polychronic time use. The statements in the scale are general and not activity specific.

This is a three-item, seven-point scale measuring the relative amount of time a person spends on achieving a healthy balance between stress and work on the one hand and rest and relaxation on the other.

The various versions of this Likert-type scale are used to measure the importance of being in fashion, particularly with regard to dress. A four-item version was suggested by Wells and Tigert (1971) and apparently used by Darden and Perreault (1976). Two-and four-item versions were used by Lumpkin and Darden (1982) and Wilkes (1992), respectively. See also the scale used by Schnaars and Schiffman (1984).

The scale has seven, seven-point Likert-type items that measure how much a person values his/her time and manages it efficiently.

The scale is composed of nine, seven-point Likert-type statements intended to measure the degree to which a person is concerned about time and engages in behaviors to manage its efficient usage.

This scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items that are intended to measure the degree to which a consumer expresses a preoccupation with purchasing products regardless of "need" (obsession) which is exhibited in his/her repetitive buying behavior (compulsion).

The degree to which a person exhibits a set of moral traits that are visible to others in his/her behavior is measured in this scale with five, seven-point Likert-type items.  The traits are typified by compassion and trustworthiness.

Seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person has a holistic view of time rather than focusing on the present, with an emphasis on working towards a better future.