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Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

lifestyle

Three, seven-point Likert-type statements are used to evaluate the use and importance that makeup plays in a consumer's everyday life.

Three, seven-point Likert-type statements are used to measure the degree to which a person views some set of clothes to be preferable to wear in a certain context. The context examined by Sirgy and colleagues (1997) was work.

This is a three-item, six-point, Likert-type scale that measures the degree to which a consumer's sense of energy conservation has influenced his/her lifestyle.

This four-item, Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person expresses a willingness if not actual enjoyment of working a lot, probably more than most others. The scale was referred to as lifestyle by Bruning, Kovacic, and Oberdick (1985).

This five-item, six-point, Likert-type scale measures a person's desire to minimize the time spent on common activities and was referred to as time spent in everyday activities by Dickerson and Gentry (1983).

This is a three-item, six-point, Likert-type scale that measures a person's expressed level of personal involvement in sports activities, not just being a spectator. It was referred to as sports enthusiast by Lumpkin and Darden (1982) and physical fitness by Hawes and Lumpkin (1984).

This four-item, six-point Likert-type scale appears to measure one's lack of self esteem due to poor health, loneliness, and/or physical immobility.

This three-item, three-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the perceived effect of one's family- and job-related responsibilities on ability to donate time to a community organization. The measure was referred to as family/job demands on time by Yavas and Riecken (1985).

This three-item, six-point, Likert-type scale measures a person's tendency to schedule activities and organize time.

This is a three-item, six-point, Likert-type scale that assesses a consumer's degree of loyalty toward local retailers. It was referred to as loyalty to local merchants by Hawes and Lumpkin (1984).