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Scale Reviews

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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

likeability

Using six items, this scale measures how positively a person evaluates a particular experience he/she has had.

How well a person likes a hotel and wants to stay there is measured with three, seven-point items.

A person's evaluation of a movie that he/she has seen is measured in this scale with seven, seven-point Likert-type items.  The scale is general in that it appears to be usable with any movie.  It may be adaptable for use with other forms of visual entertainment as well such as an episode of a TV series, a play, or a sporting event.

Six, seven-point semantic-differentials are employed in this scale to measure how beautiful and appealing something is believed to be.  The scale is general in the sense that it appears to be amenable for use with a wide variety of objects such as people, architecture, and art.

To measure a person's global attitude toward advertising, the scale uses three, five-point Likert-type items.  The statements are not specific to any particular type of advertising, facet, or context but instead apply to advertising overall.

Using four, seven-point Likert-type items, this scale measures how positive an attitude a person has toward a particular brand extension.  The scale can be used with an extension already on the market or with one in development.

With three semantic differentials and an 11-point response format, this scale measures a person's attitude about how unpleasant something is.  While the scale could be used in contexts in which the focal object is likely to be viewed as positive, its creators (Smith, Faro, and Burson 2013) used the scale with respect to people and animals experiencing some sort of suffering.

This five item scale measures how much a consumer likes a brand and is glad to be seen with it.  Given the phrasing of the items, the scale makes the most sense to use when respondents are very familiar with the brand rather than it being new, proposed, or fictitious.

Three, eight-point items are used to measure how much a person likes another person and considers him/her a friend.  Given the way the items are phrased, the other person is someone with whom the rater already has some form of relationship, e.g., neighbor, financial adviser, physician.

Eight uni-polar items are used to measure a person's belief that receiving advertising that has been personalized for him/her in some way is unpleasant and disgusting.