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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

likeability

Nine, seven-point items are used to measure how close one feels to a particular person and how likely the person would fit in one’s “in-group.”

The degree to which a customer likes a store brand and believes its quality to be high is measured in this scale using three items. 

Using three, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person has a positive opinion of product ads placed within video games.  As currently phrased, the statements are not specific to any particular game or facet of the advertising but apply to in-game advertising in general.

Using six items, this scale measures how positively a person evaluates a particular experience he/she has had.

How well a person likes a hotel and wants to stay there is measured with three, seven-point items.

A person's evaluation of a movie that he/she has seen is measured in this scale with seven, seven-point Likert-type items.  The scale is general in that it appears to be usable with any movie.  It may be adaptable for use with other forms of visual entertainment as well such as an episode of a TV series, a play, or a sporting event.

Six, seven-point semantic-differentials are employed in this scale to measure how beautiful and appealing something is believed to be.  The scale is general in the sense that it appears to be amenable for use with a wide variety of objects such as people, architecture, and art.

To measure a person's global attitude toward advertising, the scale uses three, five-point Likert-type items.  The statements are not specific to any particular type of advertising, facet, or context but instead apply to advertising overall.

Using four, seven-point Likert-type items, this scale measures how positive an attitude a person has toward a particular brand extension.  The scale can be used with an extension already on the market or with one in development.

With three semantic differentials and an 11-point response format, this scale measures a person's attitude about how unpleasant something is.  While the scale could be used in contexts in which the focal object is likely to be viewed as positive, its creators (Smith, Faro, and Burson 2013) used the scale with respect to people and animals experiencing some sort of suffering.