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Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

likeability

Seven, nine-point items are used to measure the degree to which a movie is considered to be exciting and entertaining.

The scale is composed of four single word descriptors and a ten-point response format. It attempts to assess a person's opinion of an object with an emphasis on attributes that make it desirable and attractive. Although these attributes would tend to be most relevant when describing people, Moon (2000) used them with respect to a computer and referred to the scale as attraction.

The seven-point semantic differential scale measuring the degree to which a person views a brand name as being acceptable.

Four, seven-point statements are used to assess a person's opinion of the likelihood that a particular name for a brand would be successful in the market place.

The scale is composed of four, four-point items that are intended to capture a child's tendency to respond to a brand in a consistently positive (or negative) way with the emphasis on the likeability of the brand.

The scale is composed of three, seven point items intended to measure a person's general liking of activities that are different from their daily routine.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point items intended to measure a person's general liking of activities that could enhance one's social status.

Three, seven-point statements are used to measure a person's attitude toward some specific advertisement that he or she has been exposed to with an emphasis on how much the viewer liked the ad.

Four, seven-point Likert-type statements are used to measure a person's overall evaluation of the advertising in a specific advertising vehicle. The vehicle examined by Ha (1996) was a dummy magazine prepared for a college student audience.

Three, seven-point bipolar adjectives are purported to measure a person's opinion about advertising in general without reference to any of its possible dimensions.