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Scale Reviews

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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

love

A consumer’s belief that a product or set of products connote warmth and passion in some way is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  The product, the producer, and the manner in which “love” is conveyed are not specified in the items themselves.

The scale uses five, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the degree of love and devotion a person has toward GOD.

The scale has three items and measures the degree to which a person thinks the production process for a product gave it a sense of love.  Two slightly different versions of the scale are provided in this review.  They are similar in the statements but differ in their response formats.  One is a Likert-type scale that is useful for measuring one product/brand while the other is for comparing two products/brands.

The scale measures a person’s positive affective state at a particular point in time characterized by feelings of affection and closeness.  A two-item version as well as a version with three-items were used by Cavanaugh, Bettman, and Luce (2015).

With six, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s general and enduring tendency to experience feelings of closeness and trust with other people.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person’s interest in taking advantage of sexual opportunities with different partners.

The degree to which a certain man is viewed as being in love with a certain woman is measured using three, seven-point items.  (The items appear to be easily adaptable for use with other interpersonal relationships as discussed further below.)

The scale uses three, seven-point items to measure the self-expressed likelihood that one would go after and even seduce a particular man.  (The items appear to be easily adaptable for other interpersonal relationships as discussed further below.)

One's lack of close relationships with family members and a romantic partner from whom support and encouragement can be received is measured with ten, seven-point Likert-type items.

Three, six-point, Likert-type scale items are used to measure a dimension of attachment that has to with a person's devotion to an owned object and dedication to maintaining an enduring relationship with it.