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Scale Reviews

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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

love

A consumer’s belief that a product or set of products connote warmth and passion in some way is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  The product, the producer, and the manner in which “love” is conveyed are not specified in the items themselves.

The scale uses five, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the degree of love and devotion a person has toward GOD.

The scale has three items and measures the degree to which a person thinks the production process for a product gave it a sense of love.  Two slightly different versions of the scale are provided in this review.  They are similar in the statements but differ in their response formats.  One is a Likert-type scale that is useful for measuring one product/brand while the other is for comparing two products/brands.

The scale measures a person’s positive affective state at a particular point in time characterized by feelings of affection and closeness.  A two-item version as well as a version with three-items were used by Cavanaugh, Bettman, and Luce (2015).

With six, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s general and enduring tendency to experience feelings of closeness and trust with other people.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person’s interest in taking advantage of sexual opportunities with different partners.

The degree to which a certain man is viewed as being in love with a certain woman is measured using three, seven-point items.  (The items appear to be easily adaptable for use with other interpersonal relationships as discussed further below.)

The scale uses three, seven-point items to measure the self-expressed likelihood that one would go after and even seduce a particular man.  (The items appear to be easily adaptable for other interpersonal relationships as discussed further below.)

One's lack of close relationships with family members and a romantic partner from whom support and encouragement can be received is measured with ten, seven-point Likert-type items.

Three, six-point, Likert-type scale items are used to measure a dimension of attachment that has to with a person's devotion to an owned object and dedication to maintaining an enduring relationship with it.