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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales website is a gold mine of information.  It is the only source that helps me understand the psychometric quality of the instruments used in past research.  I recommend that researchers bookmark this site . . . they will be back!
Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

loyalty

The scale measures a consumer’s strong emotional bond with a particular branded good (not service).  Given the way the product is described in the items, the product needs to be something that can potentially be lost or broken.

The scale measures a consumer’s strong emotional bond with a particular branded good (not service).  Given the way the product is described in the items, the product needs to be something that can potentially be lost or broken.

Four, five-point Likert-type items measure a customer's attitude toward his/her current and future purchases of the brand.

Four, five-point Likert-type items measure a customer’s degree of commitment and loyalty.  The scale is general in the sense that it can be easily adapted for use with a variety of business entities such as a company, brand, store, or website.

A customer’s belief that something such as a particular brand or company is better than the alternatives and that he/she is loyal to it, is measured using three, nine-point Likert-type items.

With three, seven-point Likert items, the scale measures how much a customer will return to receive service from a particular provider in the future.  The items are phrased hypothetically but a very slight change in wording can make the scale relevant for use with an actual business relationship.

The willingness of a consumer to shift companies with which he/she does business is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The likelihood that a person will engage in several behaviors that indicate loyalty to a sports team is measured using six, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale measures a customer’s belief that the relationship he/she has with a service firm is based on the long-term, reciprocal contributions of both parties and benefits to those parties.  Five, seven-point Likert-type items compose the measure.

The extent to which a consumer habitually uses a particular product or brand for a purpose without consciously thinking about its choice is measured using four, five-point Likert-type items.  Four versions of the scale are described, varying based on which product and type of usage is being referred to: a product used regularly, a product that was replaced by another product that was used regularly, a product used rarely or not at all, and a product which was replaced by another product that ended up not being used much if at all.