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This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

luxuries

With three, seven-point semantic-differentials, this scale measures the extent to which a consumer believes a product to be either a luxury brand (at one end) or a “value” brand (at the other end).

The degree to which luxury brands are viewed as expressing something about one's self (beliefs, attitudes, values) is measured with this scale using four, seven-point Likert-type items.

Four, seven-point items are used to measure the degree to which luxury brands are viewed as facilitating self-expression and helping to project a particular image in social settings.

Seven, seven-point items are used to measure the expected likelihood that a certain hotel chain has several particular benefits characteristic of a higher quality establishment.

The level of pleasure a person thinks he/she would receive from eating a particular food item is measured with three, five point Likert-type items. Given the phrasing of item #2, the food is a treat rather than something common. In the study by Naylor et al. (2008), participants responded to this scale with respect to a chocolate featured in an advertisement by a chocolatier.

The scale is composed of four, five point Likert-type items that are intended to measure the degree to which a person attributes social meaning to a recent experience at a resort/spa.

The four, seven-point items in this scale measure the degree to which a person describes an object such as a product or person as having the quality of elegance, beauty, and status. The scale was called perceptions of luxury index by Hagtvedt and Patrick (2008).

This scale has six, six-point Likert-type items that are intended to measure the degree to which a person believes that a product is either a "luxury" or a "necessity" for the majority of people.