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management

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, this scale measures the leadership of a particular company's chief executive office, particularly as it pertains to managing the development of innovative products. 

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person's beliefs regarding the degree to which those who are in charge of a particular business know what they are doing and are good at it.

Seven items are used in this scale to measure the extent to which a customer believes that a particular company is a good one to work for because it is managed well especially in how it treats its employees.

The scale is composed of five, seven-point items that assess a person's overall opinion of a company. As used by Pope, Voges, and Brown (2004), the items were phrased as semantic-differentials. In contrast, the authors' later study (Pope, Voges, and Brown 2009) adapted the scale to be Likert-type.

Three, four-point statements are used to assess the degree to which a consumer views the managers at a specified company as acting appropriately if/when factory closings are being considered. As used in the study by Klein, Smith, and John (2004), the items appear to be scored such that high scores suggest a person believes it would be flagrantly offensive to close factories unnecessarily.

Four, seven-point Likert-type statements are used to measure a person's attitude about a company and its products. The scale was called attitude toward the brand by Mathwick and Rigdon (2004) but it seems to be more about the overall company than a brand.

Five items with a seven-point response format appear to measure perceptions about the ability of sales representatives of an advertising medium to inform and persuade potential clients of their medium's advertising attractiveness. As used by King, Reid, and Morrison (1997), the scale was meant to be completed by respondents knowledgeable with media planning.

Four items with a seven-point response format are used to measure perceptions about the degree to which an advertising medium is able to target specified audiences efficiently. As used by King, Reid, and Morrison (1997), the scale was meant to be completed by respondents knowledgeable with media planning.

Eight items with a seven-point response format appear to measure perceptions about the degree to which an advertising medium offers a variety of benefits, such as opportunity for promotion tie-ins, ability to negotiate ad placement, and quality of reproduction. As used by King, Reid, and Morrison (1997), the scale was meant to be completed by respondents knowledgeable with media planning.