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Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

manufacturer

Five, seven-point Likert-type items were used to measure how much a person notices and values the effort expended by a person or company to produce an object.  To be clear, the scale measures a general attitude about things that are made rather than being specific to a particular producer or product.

The scale has three, nine-point semantic differentials that measure how enduring and long-lasting a particular object is judged to be.  The scale appears to be most appropriate when used to describe physical objects (furniture, cars, electronics) rather than non-physical entities (emotions, faith, relationships).

A person’s attitude about a particular company’s reasons for producing “environmentally friendly” products is measured with five, seven-point items.  The emphasis in two of the items is on the “environmental friendliness” of some parts of the company’s products, with that phrase meaning that the unspecified components are either good for the environment or, at least, have less of a negative impact than conventional parts.

Four, nine-point uni-polar items are used to measure the degree to which a consumer believes that a particular pair of jeans is durable and well made.

A person's belief that a company is competent at making products that will perform as expected is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale has three, seven-point items that measure a person's overall attitude toward a country as well as the products that are made there.

Four, seven-point uni-polar items compose the scale and are intended to measure a consumer's overall opinion of the products that are manufactured in a particular country.

The degree to which a consumer believes a particular product has components that are tightly coupled (integration) rather than loosely coupled (combination) is measured with four, seven-point items.  More tightly coupled systems need specific components in order to operate properly and offer limited choice of components from different suppliers.  In contrast, loose couplings offer greater freedom to mix components from different suppliers. 

The degree to which a person believes that a brand has been made by a trustworthy company, is high quality, and is better than the competition is measured with three, five-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a consumer believes that a company is able to develop new and useful products is measured in this scale with three, seven-point semantic differentials.