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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

materialism

The scale uses three, five-point Likert-type items to measure a person’s beliefs about the level of materialism of one of his/her parents.  (The scale is completed twice if assessment of both parents’ materialism is of interest.)

A person’s motivation to achieve and/or accumulate external indicators of success such as wealth, power, and status is measured with three statements.

The scale uses six, seven-point Likert-type items to measure a person’s general belief that having money is necessary in order to have a happy life and this "need" is not just true of the respondent; all people need money.

This scale uses four, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a person believes that advertising makes people buy and consume products too much.  As discussed further below, the items are phrased with respect to advertising in general but they can be easily adapted for use with particular media.

The degree to which a person buys a product because of the value derived from using it is measured with three, seven-point items.  This seems to be tapping into a utilitarian-type of consumption motivation.

The degree to which a person consumes a product because of the value derived from owning it is measured in this scale using three, seven-point items.

This four-item, five-point scale measures the frequency with which a person engages in behaviors that reflect a materially simple lifestyle with particular emphasis on buying second-hand items and not using a car for transportation.

This scale is composed of six, five-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person is oriented toward possessing goods and money as a means of personal happiness and social progress.

This scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items that are intended to measure the degree to which a consumer expresses a preoccupation with purchasing products regardless of "need" (obsession) which is exhibited in his/her repetitive buying behavior (compulsion).

The degree to which a person believes that happiness is derived from buying and owning things is measured in this scale with ten, four point items. The scale is intended for use with teens or even pre-teens and was called the Youth Materialism Scale by its developers (Goldberg et al. 2003)