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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

medical

The efficacy and likelihood that a “treatment” will cure a “condition” are measured with five, nine-point questions.  The particular treatment and condition are specified in the items.

The scale employs five, seven-point Likert-type items to measure a person’s plan to engage in certain behaviors in order to prevent skin cancer, with an emphasis on using suncreen.

A person’s expressed likelihood of engaging in behaviors that involve prevention or treatment of a health condition is measured with four, seven-point questions.  The particular health condition is not stated in the questions and should be provided in the instructions or the context of the study.

Three, seven-point items compose the scale and measure how much a person believes a particular treatment would prevent serious health consequences, including a life-threatening condition.

The scale is composed of four, seven-point items intended to measure person's interest in and likelihood of trying a particular prescription medication.

The degree to which a patient provided information and was actively involved in decision making with his/her physician during a specific visit is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a patient is pleased with the service provided by a physician and the medical facility during a specific visit is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale measures how strongly a person believes that a particular good or service is able to reveal if a person has a certain life-threatening ailment.  Three, five-point items compose the scale.

This is a three-item, five-point Likert-type scale that is intended to measure the degree to which a person thinks a specified hospital where he/she has been a patient was accurate in its billing for the services provided.

This four-item, five-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person thinks a hospital, and its rooms in particular, are appealing and clean.