You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

members

Using six, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s belief that an organization to which he/she belongs is competent and caring about its members.

The extent to which a person feels connected to and part of a specified group of people is measured with twelve, seven-point Likert-type items.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure the extent to which a person believes a certain social group is composed of several subgroups.

The scale is composed of four, nine-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person believes him/herself to be a valuable, contributing member of a specified reference group. Shang, Reed, and Croson (2008) called their version of the scale identity esteem.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person's attitude toward a business or organization, with an emphasis on the pride felt from being associated with it. The entity examined in the study by Woo, Fock, and Hui (2006) was a major university in Hong Kong.

Three items are used to measure the degree to which a person views him/herself as belonging to a specified group.

The degree to which a person believes that he/she belongs to a particular group of people is measured with three Likert-type statements.  To the extent that the person views him/herself as being part of the group and refers to it in determining attitudes and behaviors then it is a reference group.

A Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person views an organization of which he or she is a member as having a positive reputation in the community. The organization studied by Bhattacharya, Rao, and Glynn (1995) was an art museum while Arnett, German, and Hunt (2003) studied a university.

The scale is composed of three, ten-point Likert-type statements that measure the commitment a person has to being a member of a community of brand users and his/her intention to continue being a member.

Five, ten-point Likert-type statements are used to measure the degree to which a person views him/herself as a member of a community of brand users.