You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

The Marketing Scales website is a gold mine of information.  It is the only source that helps me understand the psychometric quality of the instruments used in past research.  I recommend that researchers bookmark this site . . . they will be back!
Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

memory

Four, five-point items are used to measure the degree to which a consumer likes to shop at second-hand outlets because they tend to carry older items with a special meaning to the shopper that new items do not have.

These seven, seven-point Likert-like items were used for measuring the probability that a consumer would base his/her purchase decision on information gathered from personal independent sources (relative or friend) as well as personal advocate sources (store manager or employee).

This three-item, seven-point Likert-like scale is used to measure the probability that a consumer would base his/her purchase decision on his/her relevant past experiences. The measure was referred to by Murray (1985) as past personal experience.

An eight-item, seven-point scale is used to measure the degree to which a piece of music has evoked emotion-laden memories.

A three-item, five-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person reports fantasizing and having a vivid imagination.

A three-item, seven-point scale is purported to measure the extent to which a stimulus triggers ''mellow'' sorts of emotions due to the experiences it is associated with in memory. MacInnis and Park (1991) referred to the scale variously as the valence of ''sad'' emotions and ''negative'' emotions.

This seven-point scale is purported to measure the extent to which a stimulus triggers positive emotions due to the experiences it is associated with in memory. MacInnis and Park (1991) used a six-item version in a pretest and an eight-item version in an experiment.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person who has been exposed to an advertisement describes its message as being easy to remember and having learned a lot from it.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person believes that an advertisement he/she has been exposed to has increased the likelihood of remembering the brand, recommending it, and buying it.

The scale is composed of three questions that are intended to measure the amount of difficulty a person has had in stating reasons for a behavior or decision he/she has made.