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message

How much a person believes that an advertising message explains why customers should participate in an activity is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person believes an advertising message stresses how customers can participate in an activity.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used in this scale to measure a person’s judgement of whether an advertisement emphasized benefits gained by the person taking an action or the losses and costs if the action was not taken. 

The degree to which a person thinks about the meaning of a story is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

A person’s expressed interest in the message content of an ad and the attention he/she paid to it is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Five, nine-point semantic differentials are used in this scale to measure how much a person believes that a message was persuasive and changed what he/she thought about a topic.

How much a person believes a particular message is worded normally rather than being phrased in an unusual way is measured using three items. Although Kronrod, Grinstein, and Wathieu (2012) used the scale with respect to an ad-type message, the items are amenable for use with other types of messages. 

Four, seven-point statements are used to assess the degree to which a person focuses more on the style of an ad versus the brand-related information. The phrasing of the items makes them more appropriate for print ads than for commercials.

The scale is composed of three, nine-point statements indicating a person's agreement that a print advertisement's headline was open to interpretation and noticeable effort was expended to give meaning to it.

The scale is composed of four, seven-point statements used to measure a person's sense of the amount of relevant product information that is provided in a commercial communication to which he/she has been exposed.