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mood

The 40 Likert-type items composing this scale are purported to measure the strength with which a person experiences his or her emotions. 

Five, seven-point unipolar items are used to measure a person's emotional reaction to some stimulus with an emphasis on several "negative" feelings.

The scale attempts to measure the degree to which a person who has just been exposed to some stimulus describes his/her emotional response in negative terms such as sadness and anger. The stimulus used in the study conducted by Price, Arnould, and Tierney (1995) was a river rafting trip. In the study by Coulter (1998) the stimulus was a TV program.

Five, seven-point descriptors are used to measure the degree to which a person reports feeling an upsetting, unhappy emotional reaction to some stimulus.

In both versions described here, the scale is composed of three items measuring the degree to which a person describes feeling a sense of depression. Phrasing of the scale was such that it measures a respondent's emotional reaction to a stimulus rather than the attitude toward the stimulus itself. The version of the scale used by Lacher and Mizerski (1994) used a six-point response format whereas Richins's (1997) version used four points.

Five one-word positive descriptors are used to measure a person's affective reaction to some stimulus. These descriptors are moderate in intensity as described subsequently.

Five one-word positive descriptors are used to measure a person's affective reaction to a stimulus. These descriptors suggest strong intensity and, as such, appear to represent emotions rather than less-intense sentiments.