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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

motivation

The scale is composed of four, seven-point questions that measure the level of motivation a person has towards accomplishing a particular goal in a programmed plan of effort.

Three Likert-type items are used to measure the degree which a person believes the reason a brand sponsors something, such as a team, event, or charity, is because it is something that is expected by constituents, e.g., employees, customers, the community at large.

The scale measures how much an organization is believed to be selfish and motivated by its own self-interest.  Two versions of the scale are presented and vary in terms of whether one organization is being described or if two organizations are being compared.  Most of the studies used the same eight items.

The scale is composed of four, seven-point items that measure the likelihood that a person will donate a product of his/hers that is not used anymore but could still be useful to someone else.

Using three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the extent to which a customer decides in a store to switch from accomplishing the intended goal to working on one or more other goals.  The goals themselves are not defined in the items themselves.  Further, the items do not specific whether the behavior is limited to a specific shopping trip or frequently occurs across stores and time. 

Three items are used to measure a person’s motivation to look for and gather items he/she owns that are not used anymore and could be donated.  The scale seems to make most sense to use when there has been an appeal of some sort that asked potential donors to think about things of theirs that could be given away.

The five-item Likert-scale measures a motivational state in which a customer’s imagination is stimulated by an evocative external stimulus.  In a consumer context, the inspiration is assumed to come from marketing activity although it is not stated in the items themselves.

The degree to which a customer is motivated by a stimulus (unspecified) toward the pursuit of a consumption-related goal is measured with a five-item Likert scale.  In a consumer context, the inspiration comes from some type of marketing activity and, as stated in the items, stimulates a purchase motivation.

How much a person experienced something that inspired him/her to do something is measured with four, seven-point items.  As phrased, this scale is general and could be applied in a wide variety of contexts where the focus is on a temporary state a person has experienced rather than an enduring trait.

Composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person’s reason for providing a product review to others was a sincere concern to help them make better decisions.  The items are general enough for use with regard to posting product reviews online or privately sharing opinions with friends.