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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

motivation

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the extent to which a customer wants to express his/her frustration and feelings about a particular company.

Four, seven-point items measure a person’s motivation to deal with a problematic situation by mentally restructuring the issue and taking action to make the situation better.

How much a person thinks that a particular company engages in social projects for its own sake rather than the greater good is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure how much a person believes that some customers have endorsed an agent because they sincerely think he/she is worth it.

The scale is composed of six items meant to measure a person’s motivation to process
information from an advertisement at the time of brand choice.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure how much a person’s reason for engaging in a particular behavior was to take advantage of the opportunity that appeared to be available.

A person’s chronic behavior to categorize all manner of things is measured with three, seven-point items. 

The scale measures a person’s motivation to have a lot of things because of the belief it will bring happiness.  A three-item scale and a five-item version are described.  The latter emphasizes that the desire is felt at the moment.

The scale has four, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the amount of competition one feels there is between his/her self-identities.  The particular identities referred to in the sentences are ideal and ought.  

The link between two of one’s self-identities is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.  The particular identities referred to in the sentences are ideal and ought.