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Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

motivation

The degree to which a person has a promotion (accomplishment-oriented) vs. prevention (security-oriented) motivation is measured in this scale using six, eight-point Likert-type items.

Four, seven-point items compose this scale and are intended to measure the belief that an appeal one has been exposed to is either focused on benefits for others or benefits for self.  Although the items do not specifically reference a charity, that is the context for which they were developed and most naturally employed.

The degree to which a person buys a product because of the value derived from using it is measured with three, seven-point items.  This seems to be tapping into a utilitarian-type of consumption motivation.

The degree to which a person consumes a product because of the value derived from owning it is measured in this scale using three, seven-point items.

A consumer’s pattern of acknowledging and defining needs/wants for clothing is measured using eight, seven-point Likert-type items.

An eight-item, five-point summated scale is used to measure the importance to a potential donor of a charity's support services that focus on preventing problems from developing. It was described by Harvey (1990) as the preventative/facilitative services dimension of the fundraising ''product.''

A five-item, five-point summated scale is used to measure the importance to a potential donor of a charity's support services that focus on repairing damage already done. It was described by Harvey (1990) as the curative services dimension of the fundraising ''product.''

A nine-item, five-point scale is used to measure the importance of various business aspects of a charity to a potential donor. It was described by Harvey (1990) as the management activities dimension of the fundraising ''product.''

A four-item, five-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the importance a consumer places in a product-selection decision on what others think or are doing. This was referred to as social motivations for consumption by Moschis (1978, 1981) and Carlson and Grossbart (1988; Grossbart, Carlson, and Walsh 1991).

A four-item, five-point summated scale is used to measure the importance to a potential donor of the pressure tactics used by a charity in its fundraising activities. It was described by Harvey (1990) as the campaign intensity dimension of the fundraising ''product.''