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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

movies

How much a person liked a particular experience and thought it was fun is measured in this scale with four, nine-point items.

The extent to which a person believes that a particular story and the facts stated in it are correct is measured in this scale using three, seven-point Likert-type items.  The scale seems to be amenable for use with advertisements, books, and movies by simply replacing the word "story" in each item with something else if desired.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure a person's belief that a story has a climax in which the main character overcomes obstacles.  The scale seems to be amenable for use with advertisements, books, and movies by making minor changes in each item.

A person's evaluation of a movie that he/she has seen is measured in this scale with seven, seven-point Likert-type items.  The scale is general in that it appears to be usable with any movie.  It may be adaptable for use with other forms of visual entertainment as well such as an episode of a TV series, a play, or a sporting event.

Three, five-point Likert-type items are used in the scale to measure the degree to which a person was not certain of an event's ending when it was occurring and was interested to find out what would happen.  The items seem to be amenable for use with a TV program, an advertisement, an election, or a variety of other things as well.

Based upon some reviews he/she has read, a person's attitude about a movie and interest in seeing it is measured with three, nine-point Likert-type items.

This semantic differential scale with four, seven-point items measures a person's attitude about something that is written.  As used by Bhatnagar and Wan (2011), the written object was a travel-related article.  The items appear to be amenable for use with other written texts such as print ads, scripts, books, poetry, etc.  The scale might even be used with something that is not actually read by the respondent but is based on something written, e.g., play, movie, TV show.

The scale measures expectancy-disconfirmation of a movie performance using eight items and a nine-point response format.

This scale uses six, seven-point semantic differentials to measure a person's evaluation of a movie. It seems to combine measurement of a person's attitude about a movie's quality, the person's motivation to see it, and his/her opinion about the movie's likelihood of success.

Six, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person's attitude about a movie which he/she has heard about but has not seen. While the scale might be considered a measure of attitude-toward-the-act, it is not a measure of behavioral intention.