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Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

music

The extent to which a person is interested in and feels attached to a particular subculture is measured with six, five-point Likert-type items.

With three, nine-point items, the scale measures how much a person anticipates that some particular experiences would help him/her be more certain of preferences with regard to a certain product category.  The scale was made to be used with sensory-related experiences but might be flexible enough for use in other contexts as well.

The scale uses three, nine-point items to measure how much a person expects that some particular experiences would enhance his/her sociability, at least when it comes to interacting with others with respect to a certain topic.  The scale was made to be used with sensory-related experiences but might be flexible enough for use in other contexts as well.

The scale uses three, seven-point unipolar items to measure the extent to which a person perceives words or sounds to have a cadence and/or rhyming quality.

An eight-item, seven-point scale is used to measure the degree to which a piece of music has evoked emotion-laden memories.

A seven-point Likert-like scale is used to measure a person's beliefs regarding a particular brand of audio player. Muehling, Laczniak, and Stoltman (1991) referred to this measure as cognitive structure index and used it to examine a fictitious brand of cassette player.

Three, one-word descriptors are used to measure the degree to which one likes some stimulus and perceives it to be ''good.'' Although the study reported here used the scale with respect to musical stimuli it is possible to use it for other stimuli as well. The construct was referred to by MacInnis and Park (1991) as likeability.

Five, seven-point items are used to measure the perceived beauty and stability in a stimulus. As used by Raghubir and Greenleaf (2006), the respondents were describing concerts based upon printed invitations. Thus, the scale has more to do with visual proportion and concordance than it does with the aural enjoyment of music.

The scale has three, ten point items that are intended to measure the degree to which some music is liked and familiar. As used by Bailey and Areni (2006), the scale had to do with a category of music rather than just one song.

Ten, nine-point items are used to measure the degree of disconfirmation a person experiences in his/her expectations regarding some music.