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The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

nervousness

Using three, 10 point questions, this scale measures the degree to which a person thought about how he/she was being evaluated by a particular person with whom he/she had interacted.  In this case, “evaluation” is meant more in the sense of being “sized-up” or judged rather than formal testing or professional diagnosis.

The general level of discomfort a person reports feeling in the presence of others is measured with six statements.

This seven item, 10 point Likert-type scale measures a type of social anxiety that primarily occurs as a result of interacting with other people.

Four, seven-point semantic differentials are used in this scale to measure the level of fear that has been evoked by some stimulus.

How much a consumer feels nervous and worried about buying a specified product is measured in this scale with three, seven point Likert-type items.

The scale uses three, nine-point uni-polar terms to measure how much a person feels under pressure and worried about something.  The scale is "general" in the sense that the three items composing the scale are not specific to any particular object or event and can be paired with properly written instructions for any number of contexts.

The degree to which thinking about the use of a particular service makes a person feel uncomfortable is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.  To be clear, it is not usage of the service itself that causes the anxiety but rather thinking about using it that causes the problem.

A person's anxiety-related response to an advertisement is measured in this scale using three, seven-point uni-polar items.

This unipolar scale assesses the fear and stress a person reports feeling with respect to some object or experience.  Maheswaran and Meyers-Levy (1990) used seven items while the version used by Winterich and Haws (2011) had four.

A three-item, five-point scale is used to measure the degree to which one reports that something has made him/her feel nervous and fearful. Mano and Oliver (1993) referred to the scale as distress.