You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

newness

How new and surprising a product development process is believed to be is measured using four, seven-point items.  The statements composing the scale are flexible enough to be used when comparing two products or when assessing just one product, but the response formats would need to be different.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes that the packaging for a particular product is new and unique.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure whether the product featured in an ad is considered fresh and new or old and routine.

The anticipated popularity of a new product and the interest among consumers in purchasing it is measured with three, seven-point questions.

A person's description of his/her level of innovativeness and originality is measured with three, five-point uni-polar items.

Three statements are used in this scale to measure a customer's opinion of how much a particular salesperson provides information about new goods and services.

Four, seven-point items are used to measure how distinct and unexpected a particular object is viewed to be.  As used by Kim, Han, and Yoon (2010), the object was an advertisement.

This three-item, seven-point scale is used to measure how new and different a product is compared to current products the consumer is aware of and the perceived impact it would have on the consumer's behavior.

This eleven item, seven-point scale measures the attitude a consumer has toward a specific new product. The scale is broad enough to tap not only into what a person thinks about a specified product, but also how it is thought others might respond to it. The scale was referred to as attractiveness of innovation.

This is a four-item, six-point, Likert-type scale measuring a shopper's innovativeness, particularly in relation to stores and brands. It was referred to as shopping innovation by Hawes and Lumpkin (1984).