You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

news

Five, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person’s attitude regarding the bias and believability of a particular news story to which he/she has been exposed.

A person’s intentions to not only complain directly to the company but also to news media and multiple levels of government is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.

Respondents are asked to use a five-point scale to rate how important each of nine sources is in learning about a specified topic. The nine information sources mainly involve the traditional mass media.

Likert-type statements are used to measure the degree to which a person believes that an advertisement contains information that is useful in some way.

The scale is composed of thirteen, five-point items measuring the frequency with which a person reports watching specific types of programs on television.

The scale is composed of four, five-point items that measure the frequency with which a person watches television in order to hear the local, national, and international news.

The frequency with which a person uses the web in order to keep up with local, national, and international news is measured using three, five-point items.

The likelihood that a person will use the web in the future to access a wide range of information and light entertainment-type services such as news, sports, movie reviews, and weather is measured using eight, five-point items.