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Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

novelty

Three, seven-point semantic-differentials are used to measure how much a person believes that an object is original and uncommon. 

The scale uses seven items to measure how much a person believes that a particular typeface is uncommon and difficult to read.  Responses to the items are made with a seven-point Likert-type scale.

With three, seven-point semantic differentials, the scale measures the novelty and interestingness of a sponsorship being promoted in an advertisement by a sponsoring entity for something such as an event, an organization, or a cause.

The scale has five, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person believes a particular advertisement contains elements that are novel or unusual and yet artistically arranged.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure whether the product featured in an ad is considered fresh and new or old and routine.

A consumer’s enjoyment of shopping for a variety of related reasons (adventure, novelty, curiosity) is measured with five, five-point Likert-type items.

Four semantic differentials are used to measure how fresh and original a product is believed to be.  The scale seems to be flexible for use with a wide variety of products and other objects.

How much a person expects that some particular experiences would provide the opportunity to explore what is new in a product category is measured with three, nine-point items.  The scale was made to be used with sensory-related experiences but might be flexible enough for use in other contexts as well.

The extent to which a person believes that something is uncommon and distinct is measured in this scale with four, uni-polar items along with a seven-point Likert-type response format.  The scale is general in the sense that the items are amenable for use in a wide variety of situations when participants are given the proper instructions.

Using three, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person enjoys trying multiple brands within a product category.  The scale was called brand variety seeking by Hung, Li, and Tse (2011).