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The Marketing Scales website is a gold mine of information.  It is the only source that helps me understand the psychometric quality of the instruments used in past research.  I recommend that researchers bookmark this site . . . they will be back!
Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

nutrition

The degree to which a person believes a particular food is wholesome and healthy is measured with three questions, each with its own semantic differential and a 101-point sliding response scale.

Four, seven-point items measure how much a person believes that a particular food is good to eat and is not fattening.

The ease with which a consumer can determine the healthiness of a food product from information provided on its package is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

Using four, nine-point semantic differentials, the scale measures a consumer’s belief that a particular food product is not only safe to consume but is nutritious as well.

A consumer’s nutrition-focused attitude about a food product is measured using five, seven-point Likert-type items.  Because of the limitations of one of the items, a four item version is also described that can be used with a wider variety of foods.

The belief that organic foods do not contain unnatural ingredients and chemicals is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s belief that organic food is more nutritious than conventional food.

The degree to which a person believes that he/she will suffer physically if he/she has unhealthy eating patterns is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale measures how strongly a person believes that certain habits related to one's diet and physical activity eventually lead to poor health.

A 12-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree of control one believes he/she has over his/her health-related behaviors. The emphasis is on engaging in the behaviors rather than the outcome of those behaviors.