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Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

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With six, nine-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s general attitude that society should have well-defined rules (social norms and laws) and that punishment is appropriate when rules are not adhered to.

The scale uses four, nine-point items to measure the extent to which it is believed that something, such as a particular person or group, is corrupting society and harming social order.

With three, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a customer’s belief that a particular online retailer delivers exactly what customers have ordered.

Five short phrases with a seven-point Likert-type response format are used to measure how nice and pleasant looking a store is where an order was placed.

With five short phrases and a seven-point Likert-type response format, the scale measures the extent to which a customer believes a store where an order was placed appears to be convenient to use based on such things as low time and effort ordering costs. 

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items intended to measure the ease with which a person reports being able to order and pay for products at a particular website.

A seven-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used in measuring the degree to which a person thinks an educational institution has grounds, buildings, equipment, and professors that are neat and clean.

The seriousness of a situation is measured in this scale using five, seven-point bi-polar adjectives.

The scale is composed of forty-two, six-point Likert-type statements that assess the extent to which a person expresses a need for definite answers rather than ambiguity.

The seven point semantic differential scale measures a person's beliefs concerning the perceived degree of accuracy and reliability in a certain activity. The activity examined by Dabholkar (1994) was ordering in a fast-food restaurant and two options were compared: touch screen ordering versus verbally placing the order with an employee. Dabholkar and Bagozzi (2002) just examined the touch screen option. Thus, in these contexts, the scale assessed the degree to which a method of ordering was thought to lead to the intended result (getting exactly what was wanted).