You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

orders

Five short phrases with a seven-point Likert-type response format are used to measure how nice and pleasant looking a store is where an order was placed.

With five short phrases and a seven-point Likert-type response format, the scale measures the extent to which a customer believes a store where an order was placed appears to be convenient to use based on such things as low time and effort ordering costs. 

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items intended to measure the ease with which a person reports being able to order and pay for products at a particular website.

The seven point semantic differential scale measures a person's beliefs concerning the perceived degree of accuracy and reliability in a certain activity. The activity examined by Dabholkar (1994) was ordering in a fast-food restaurant and two options were compared: touch screen ordering versus verbally placing the order with an employee. Dabholkar and Bagozzi (2002) just examined the touch screen option. Thus, in these contexts, the scale assessed the degree to which a method of ordering was thought to lead to the intended result (getting exactly what was wanted).

The scale is composed of five, seven-point Likert type statements intended to measure a person's attitude about the extent to which a website tailors its products, promotion, and transactional environment to individual customers.

The scale has three items and is intended to measure a person's attitude about the way a particular website manages orders with the emphasis on issues relevant to customers, e.g., providing confirmation of orders, delivery options, and clear return policies.

The five-item, five-point scale measures the likelihood that a person might use the web in the future to make reservations and/or purchase a wide range of products such as food, tickets, and clothes.

Four, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure a person's beliefs regarding the perceived degree of accuracy (getting exactly what was asked for) that would be experienced in using a specified method of placing an order. As described here, the setting used by Dabholkar (1994) was ordering at a fast-food restaurant, and two options were compared: touch-screen ordering versus verbally placing the order with an employee.

Four, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure a person's beliefs regarding the perceived interest and enjoyment that would be experienced in using a specified method of placing an order. As described here, the setting used by Dabholkar (1994) was ordering at a fast-food restaurant, and two options were compared: touch-screen ordering versus verbally placing the order with an employee.

A four-item, seven-point semantic differential scale is used to measure a person's evaluation of a specified method of placing an order. The setting used by Dabholkar (1994) was ordering at a fast-food restaurant and two options were compared: touch-screen ordering versus verbally placing the order with an employee.