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Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

outcomes

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used in this scale to measure a person’s judgement of whether an advertisement emphasized benefits gained by the person taking an action or the losses and costs if the action was not taken. 

Three Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person would make a different choice if possible given an outcome that has occurred to a decision he/she made.

The scale measures how strongly a person believes that a particular good or service is able to reveal if a person has a certain life-threatening ailment.  Three, five-point items compose the scale.

The scale measures how bad a person believes the unintended reactions of a health-related good/service could be.  The construct being measured is akin to the consequences component of perceived risk (e.g., Cox 1967; Dowling 1986).  Three, five-point items compose the scale.

The scale measures the degree to which a person thinks about the potential future consequences of his/her current behavior and how much he/she is influenced by these possible outcomes.  Twelve items are used to measure the construct.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure the extent to which a person is pleased with the result of a particular event, e.g., bargaining.

Three, nine-point items are used to measure the degree to which a person feels in control of a choice and takes personal responsibility for the outcome.

This scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items that are intended to measure the tendency for a person to assume the best will happen and concentrate more on the positive consequences of decisions rather than the negative.

Six, seven-point Likert-type items are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a person consciously considers potential consequences before making decisions including their likelihood and significance.

Three, nine-point bi-polar adjectives are used to measure the extent to which a person believes a certain result has been achieved.