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Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

ownership

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure a consumer’s belief that he/she has the power to handle and use an object as desired.

This scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure a consumer’s beliefs that he/she has insight into the characteristics, quality, and aesthetics of an object.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items the scale measures how much a consumer feels that he/she has devoted money, emotion, and other psychological resources to an object.

The scale uses four Likert-type items to measure how much a person believes that another person does not legally own a certain item but is engaging in behaviors that seem to signal that he/she does.

Using seven statements, this scale measures the degree to which a person believes that he/she is familiar with and has experience using goods and/or services in a particular domain.  Versions of the scale are described for tech products, fast-food restaurants, personal banking, movie theaters, and social media websites.

This scale uses four, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a person believes that advertising makes people buy and consume products too much.  As discussed further below, the items are phrased with respect to advertising in general but they can be easily adapted for use with particular media.

How likely a person believes it is that he/she will choose a product sharing program rather than buying a certain product is measure with three, six-point items.

Three, six-point Likert-type items measure a person's belief that a product that is shared with others is just as good as one that is personally owned.

How much an object is worth to a person is measured in this scale with three items.  Although the scale might be used for other purposes, it makes the most sense when used with an object that has been owned or associated with someone who could be viewed by the respondent as a "celebrity."  Even if that person is not liked, the association may lead to the object being valued more by the respondent than it otherwise would have been.

Three, six-point, Likert-type scale items are used to measure a dimension of attachment that has to with a person's devotion to an owned object and dedication to maintaining an enduring relationship with it.