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Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

packaging

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure how much a consumer believes that a set of brands they were exposed to seem to have been intentionally made to resemble each other.  While the sentences do not explicitly refer to the similarity of brands’ packaging or some other visual attribute, that is the implication.

The ease with which a consumer can determine the healthiness of a food product from information provided on its package is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes that the packaging for a particular product is new and unique.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure how different the design of an object is viewed as being from the norm.

This scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a consumer prefers to purchase products that are believed to have less negative impact on the environment.

Four, seven-point items are used to measure a person’s attitude about the usefulness of the third-party label on a package that attests to some aspect of the product’s quality.

The level of trust a person has in a third party label on a package and the party sponsoring it that attests to an aspect of the product’s quality is measured using six, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a consumer tries to choose products that have the least negative impact on the environment is measured with ten statements.  The emphasis is on products that are energy-efficient or that can be recycled.

Using three items, this scale measures a person's concern about the environmental problem of solid waste reduction, particularly as it pertains to the need for reduced packaging and purchase of recycled paper products.

Using five, seven-point items, this scale measures the degree to which a consumer believes a product's package has affected how much was eaten in a particular situation.  In the study by Argo and White (2012), the presence and size of a package appear to have played roles.  The phrasing of the items seems to make the scale amenable for use when other aspects of a package such as the nutrition label or instructions are being examined.