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Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

parents

With four, five-point items, the scale measures an adolescent’s belief that his/her parents would care about he/she thought if they said some media content is unsuitable for children, e.g., there is too much violence in movies and video games.

Four, five-point items are used in this scale to measure an adolescent’s belief about what his/her parents would say if they did not want him/her to watch television, movies, or video games that contained too much violence.  Specifically, this belief is a characterized by the parents “restricting” the time the child spends with the unacceptable media content and providing rationale in which the perspective of the adolescent is taken seriously.

The scale has four, five-point items that measure what an adolescent thinks his/her parents would do if they did not want him/her to watch television, movies, or video games that contained too much violence.  Specifically, this belief is a characterized by the parents “restricting” the time the child spends with unacceptable media content by using anger and threatening punishment.

The scale uses four, five-point items to measure the degree to which an adolescent thinks his/her parents are inconsistent in their restriction of the time he/she can spend with television, movies, and video games that contained too much violence.

The belief that one’s parent(s) firmly directed the children while they were growing up and expected unquestioning obedience is measured with ten Likert items.

This scale uses ten Likert items to measure the degree to which a person believes that his/her parent(s) provided clear and firm direction for their kids while they were growing up but were reasonable and flexible as well.

With ten Likert items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes that his/her parent(s) made few demands on the kids while they were growing up and allowed them to regulate their own activities.

The scale uses three, five-point Likert-type items to measure a person’s beliefs about the level of materialism of one of his/her parents.  (The scale is completed twice if assessment of both parents’ materialism is of interest.)

The scale uses three, five-point items to measure how much a child believes a parent was disappointed with him/her and too busy to spend time together.

The degree to which a child believes his/her relationship with a parent to be (or have been) encouraging and comforting is measured with four, five-point items.