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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

patriotism

The eight item, nine-point Likert-type scale is intended to measure a person's attitude regarding the fairness and justifiability of the socio-political system in which he/she lives.

A person's heightened concern about the security of personal and financial information when it is handled by foreign service agents is measured using five statements.

Six statements are used in this scale to measure a person's belief that companies should not send jobs to other countries and it is the government's responsibility to make sure it does not happen.

This scale has five, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the extent to which a person values one's culture, traditions, and family heritage.

Ten, seven-point items are used to measure the extent to which a person identifies with people in his/her local community.

The scale is composed of five, seven-point Likert-type statements that are intended to measure the degree to which a person identifies with a particular country. The items might also be used with respect to a subculture or ethnic group.

The extent to which a person expresses preference for and identification with his/her country rather than others is measured with this six item, five-point scale.

A person’s attitude toward the appropriateness of purchasing American-made products versus those manufactured in other countries is measured using a seventeen-item, seven-point Likert-type scale. The scale was called CETSCALE (consumers' ethnocentric tendencies) by its creators, Shimp and Sharma 1987. The scale has been used in a variety of languages and countries. A ten-item version of the scale has been used in some studies and a revised version of the scale was used by Herche (1992).

The three-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is intended to measure a person's attitude concerning a retailer's adherence to unwritten rules of social conduct with the emphasis on how well it supports the nation and identifies with it.

A three-item, six-point scale is used to measure the degree to which a person describes feeling a sense of victory and/or patriotism upon exposure to some stimulus (e.g., music). Phrasing of the scale was such that it measured a respondent's emotional reaction to a stimulus rather than attitude toward the stimulus itself.