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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

patronage

The scale is composed of four, seven-point items that measure a consumer’s likelihood of going to a particular restaurant in the unspecified future.

Using three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person blames a specific entity (store, company, organization) and its strategies for him/her terminating the relationship between them.

The scale has four, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person has an affective connection to a particular location-based place.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes a particular place is unique in the sense that it has distinctive characteristics not found in other places it might be compared to.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s satisfaction with a website, particularly the usefulness of its content and the desire to visit the site frequently.

Using three items, the scale measures a customer’s positive attitude toward purchasing items in a store and shopping there again in the future.  Because the items are stated hypothetically and are indefinite about when the shopping would occur, the scale might more precisely be measuring willingness to shop or attitude toward the act of shopping than strictly shopping intention.

The scale uses six, seven-point Likert-type items to measure a customer’s social bond with the employees at a specific retail establishment.  To be clear, the scale is intended to measure attachment to the workers at a location-specific business rather than the attachment to the employees at all locations in a chain or the general tendency to bond with employees.

The strength of the relationship and bond a customer has with other customers of a particular retailer is measured with six, seven-point Likert-type items.  To be clear, the scale is intended to measure attachment to the people who come to a location-specific establishment.  The scale does not measure attachment to the physical dimensions of the place, attachment to customers at all locations in a chain, or the general tendency to bond with other customers.

The strength of a person’s emotional bond to a physical place is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.  To be clear, the scale is intended to measure attachment to the physical aspect of the place rather than attachment to the people who come there.

Using four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the strength of a person’s emotional bond to the people associated with a specific place.  To be clear, the scale is intended to measure attachment to the people who come to a place or, possibly, work there rather than attachment to the physical dimension of the place.