You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your research. Search Now

Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Creative Channel Services

perception

The degree to which a person reports being involved in and stimulated by a particular stimulus is measured with four, nine-point uni-polar items.

The scale has four, seven-point semantic differentials that are intended to measure the visual clarity and intensity of a particular advertisement.

This three item, seven point scale measures the extent to which a person had difficulty distinguishing product relevant information from background graphics in a particular advertisement. As written, the scale is most suited for a print ad.

With seven, seven-point items, the scale is used to measure the degree to which a person is characterized by one of two trait-like “modes” of attention: focus on the immediate environment (experiencing) or stimuli-independent thought (mind wandering).

During a particular task, how much a person’s mind was wandering and thinking about other things is measured with three, five-point items.

With six, nine-point bi-polar adjectives, the scale measures the degree to which an object appears to be unusual and unexpected.  Given the multiple facets of the construct represented in the items and depending on the way the items are scored, the scale could be considered a measure of similarity, typicality, or novelty.  The scale is general in the sense that it could be used with a variety of objects and in a variety of contexts.  

Five, nine-point semantic differentials are used to measure how visually well-defined and vivid a stimulus appears to be.

Five items are used to measure how ambiguous and chaotic a visual stimulus with multiple parts appears to be.

The scale has three items and measures how easily a person reports being able to visualize an object and describe it later.

Three questions with seven-point semantic differential response scales are employed to measure how well a person reports being able to imagine a product he/she is customizing.